Page 31 - Alaska Bride & Groom 2022
P. 31

  GUESTS SHOW UP EXPECTING
A BIG MEAL BUT THERE’S ONLY FINGER FOOD. Make sure to communicate with your guests all the general information, including if they’ll have to pay for anything or if they should plan to eat before arriving. If you’re only serving finger foods, tell your guests at your wedding website and on their invitation.
THE FLOWER GIRL OR RING BEARER IS SHY AND WON’T BUDGE AND/OR RUNS DOWN THE AISLE CRYING AND SCREAMING. Why
not have another person walk them down the aisle. Usually the presence of an adult – or even another child – will help calm them down. If they’re being fussy about walking down the aisle, incentivize it a bit with some candy or a treat. If all else fails, even when kids don’t cooperate, they make an adorable addition to a wedding.
BUGS EAT THE GUESTS ALIVE.
If you’re hosting an outdoor ceremony or reception, you need
to consider the unwanted, winged guests that may arrive. Consult with the site’s manager for solutions such as strategically placed mosquito traps, or spraying the ground with
a nonpoisonous bug spray an hour or two before the wedding. Choose a spray that won’t leave a lingering odor. If these aren’t an option, then a location away from water might be your best bet. If you’re scrambling before your wedding, adding baskets of bug spray are an easy fix. Alternatively, if you want to keep things a little more natural, bring in flowers that ward off bugs, such as lavender, geraniums or marigolds. You can also rent a few fans and place them around your reception space. The extra air will literally blow the bugs away!
YOUR BUTTERCREAM WEDDING CAKE MELTS IN THE SUMMER SUN. For food safety, your wedding cake should only be out for four hours at most. Cake is usually served towards the end of an evening, which could push a buttercream frosting to its limit for safety and appearance. To
prevent a cake catastrophe, keep
it stored in a fridge until close to serving time, and avoid placing the cake in direct sunlight. Talk with your baker to see how long your frosting choice will hold up in the sun.
AWKWARD FAMILY DRAMA REARS ITS UGLY HEAD. If there is ongoing drama prior to the wedding, it may very well bubble to the surface
when everyone is in the same room. Damage control: Be upfront with your wedding day coordinator about any tricky family dynamics so they can help minimize any potential awkward encounters. You could also assign somebody – the wedding planner,
a groomsman or another trusted guest – the task of making sure the family members keep their distance and, if a feud or fight does break
out, stepping in and breaking it up. Another tip is to talk in advance with family members, letting them know where they will be seated for the wedding festivities. The best way to spearhead these problems before the big day arrives is to identify them and attempt to assuage them during the planning process.
THE BRIDE IS DEALING WITH TOO MANY DETAILS AND CAN'T ENJOY HER BIG DAY. Plan ahead, and
give yourself plenty of time – don’t take on DIY tasks that have to be completed on your wedding day, like making your bouquet or baking your cake. When you’re making plans, designate different points of contact for tasks on the big day – someone for different vendors to check in with or ask questions. Hiring a wedding planner takes away the stress of tying together small details, but if it’s out of the picture, consider hiring a “day-of” or “week-of” wedding coordinator.
A day-of or week-of planner can touch base with all the vendors, iron out last-minute wrinkles and take over the reins on the bride’s special day. Above all, delegate as much of the work ahead of time as possible. That way, on your big day, knowing that anything that goes wrong is in someone else’s hands, you can take a deep breath, relax and enjoy the day.
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